Museum Blog

A Mammoth Discovery

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Woolly mammoths have long captured the imagination of the public. Woolly mammoths lived over 2 million years ago, the last species to emerge from the mammoth family. Mammoths first appeared around 5 million years and died out around 11-12,000 years ago…with a few exceptions. A group of mammoths on St. Paul Island, Alaska did not […]

Museum Blog

National Fossil Day

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Today, October 14, is National Fossil Day which is “an annual celebration held to highlight the scientific and educational value of paleontology and the importance of preserving fossils for future generations.”[1] Here at the museum, we’ve decided to share one of our fossils that is full of mystery. Charles D. Walcott was the leading expert […]

Garden Park Fossil Area

Dino-mite

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Recently, this Allosaurus tooth was found in the Garden Park Fossil Area. Andrew Smith, paleontologist with the Bureau of Land Management, excavated and prepared the tooth. It is an anterior tooth, located in the front of the mouth. Allosaurus teeth are serrated which would have been helpful in gripping and ripping meat. Similar to sharks, […]

Fremont County

Happy Birthday Prof. Kessler!

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Hundreds of visitors have, and will continue, to stroll past the stegosaurus fossil in the Prehistoric Journey exhibit at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. The question is, how many of them know who found it? Or even that it was found only a few hours’ drive from where they stand in the museum? […]

Fremont County

A Surprising Find

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25 years ago in July of 1992, a group of volunteers from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and from the Garden Park Paleontology Society began an excavation braving high temperatures, thunderstorms and flash floods. So what was considered so important? One of the most complete Stegosaurus stenops skeletons ever found! Missing only its […]