Museum Blog

Photographer J. Melvin Affleck

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J. Melvin Affleck gave his family quite the scare in 1913 when he disappeared one night. On May 22, 1913, the Cañon City Record reported on the events. Fourteen young men responded to an alarm that was sounded 20 minutes to 11:00 PM from the electrical power plant. The men were equipped with lanterns by […]

Museum Blog

Is Higher Education Deadly during Pandemics?

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By Kodee Summers The 1918 Flu Pandemic, which started in spring 1918 and lasted till early summer 1919, infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide and killed an estimated 20 to 50 million victims. Also known as the Spanish Flu, it was first observed in Europe, the United States, and parts of Asia. Influenza is […]

Now and Then

Now & Then: The Espinosa Brothers – Part Three

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By Loretta (Stevens) Bailey This is the third and final part of this article covering the Espinosa brothers. This portion also contains excerpts from records written by eyewitnesses of the events. THE CASE FOR NASH SPRING by Nelson D. Walker While investigating the Espinosa incident I talked to five different ranchers whose families had been […]

Museum Blog

You Rock!

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Skyline Drive is easily one of the most recognizable attractions of Cañon City. As you drive up the road, there is an arch that signals the beginning of the drive, made of up stones. What makes this gateway unique is that each state has at least one stone in the archway representing them. In 1939, […]

Museum Blog

Hatters Gonna Hat

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Headwear in some form or another has persisted throughout history. Hats are representative of both fashion and social changes during different periods of time. In honor of hat day, here are some photos from our collection of different styles of women’s hats from the 1880s to the 1960s. 1880s Hats during this time generally had […]